Category Archive: Articles Opinion Pieces

An archive of APH Opinion Pieces in descending order of publication

The Wrong Moves: Adam Goodes and the Egalitarian Tradition in Australian Rules Football

by Will Peart

PhD Candidate, Deakin University

I am usually sympathetic to the Australian egalitarian tradition to dislike grandstanding and pretentiousness. But it turns out the naysayers are right: there’s something rotten about it. Given the brevity of Adam Goodes’ celebratory war dance in Round 9 of the AFL, a minor Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/the-wrong-moves-adam-goodes-and-the-egalitarian-tradition-in-australian-rules-football

Art For (High) Art’s Sake

by Rebecca Hawkings PhD Candidate Department of Modern History Macquarie University

The Coalition Government’s presumptive Arts Minister, George Brandis, is as passionate about the arts sector as any previous Minister to hold the portfolio. But his ascension back into the role is not good news for Australian popular music practitioners.

The 2013 Federal Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/art-for-high-arts-sake

Raising our eyes in the wake of the Federal Election

by David Lowe

Director of the Alfred Deakin Research Institute at Deakin University and co-founder of the Australian Policy and History Network

 

Come September, Aussie Rules football fever is everywhere in Victoria, and indeed to varying extents, it captures attention throughout Australia. For the clubs lucky enough to be playing Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/raising-our-eyes

The 1965-66 mass killings in Indonesia: Recent developments towards historical justice

by Jemma Purdey

Alfred Deakin Research Institute

At the height of the Cold War, Indonesia’s Communist Party (PKI) was a significant force in national politics, with a growing following and increasing support from President Sukarno as he sought to share in what appeared would soon become a significant political power base. Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/the-1965-66-mass-killings-in-indonesia

How much should Australians know about Papua New Guinea?

by Jon Ritchie, Alfred Deakin Research Institute, Deakin University

 

In the last week Papua New Guinea (PNG) has received more exposure in the Australian media than it has for a very long time indeed.  Ever since news of the ‘Regional Resettlement Arrangement Between Australia and Papua New Guinea’ agreement between Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/how-much-should-australians-know-about-papua-new-guinea

Consumer Policy, the Carbon Tax, and selling Consumption Reduction

Consumer Policy, the Carbon Tax, and selling Consumption Reduction

Amanda McLeod

 

Under Julia Gillard, the ALP federal government has missed an important opportunity to sell the benefits of consumption reduction alongside its Carbon Tax (Clean Energy legislation). The government continues to get caught up in debates about compensation and tax Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/consumerpolicycarbontax

Just Say No: Consumer policy and the case for restricting rights

by Amanda McLeod

Dr Amanda McLeod is a historian and commentator interested in consumer policy and commercial, social and political life. She holds a PhD in history from Monash University (2004) where she is currently an Adjunct Research Associate. Her first book, Abundance: Mass Consumption in Postwar Australia, was published in Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/just-say-no-consumer-policy

What’s Wrong with Anzac?

by Marilyn Lake, Humanities and Social Sciences, La Trobe University

 

New publication What’s Wrong with Anzac? The Militarisation of Australian History, Marilyn Lake and Henry Reynolds with Mark McKenna and Joy Damousi, UNSW Press, 2010.

In recent years Australia has been bombarded with military history across all media: books, radio and TV Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/what%e2%80%99s-wrong-with-anzac

WA: The Vulnerable State

by Peter McMahon, School of Sustainability, Murdoch University

 

Last year Australia experienced the extremes of weather with killer bushfires in Victoria and destructive floods in Queensland. The Victorian bushfires and Queensland floods reminded us yet again that nature at her worst is far beyond the efforts of humankind to control. Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/wa-the-vulnerable-state

Volunteering — the ‘Blind Spot’ of Economic and Taxation Policy

by Melanie Oppenheimer School of Humanities, UNE

There is increasing speculation surrounding the release of the Henry review of the Australian Taxation System. Most likely there will be little on offer for Australia’s 5.4 million adult volunteers. Despite their labour contributing an estimated $42 billion a year to the Australian economy – more Read more »

Permanent link to this article: http://aph.org.au/volunteering-the-blind-spot

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